Excess Inventory Stores Attract Bargain Hunters

The lure of a bargain sent shoppers to NuNu’s bargains in Greendale on Thursday. They were taking advantage of a new trend in retail. Some local businesses buy excess inventory from major retailers, such as Target and Walmart, and resell it to consumers at deep discounts. This store, and others in Racine, Brookfield and other local communities, are part of a new generation of businesses that buy truckloads of excess and overstock from major retailers and resell them at bargain prices. , posting some of their wares on social media. “We buy backorders, closeouts, excess inventory at Target, Walmart, basically nationwide,” said NuNu store manager Chris Rafalski. Mueller got a tablet and a microwave, and Maile Ryan found a Ring doorbell, all for $12 apiece. The store lowers the price of its items each day of the week, possibly as low as $1, until that week’s stock is picked up. The store closes on Tuesdays and Wednesdays to restock its shelves and bins. When new pallets of goods hit the sales floor on Thursday, it can create a chaotic scene for shoppers, but that’s part of the business model. It’s a business pattern created by supply chain and shipping issues and a record number of merchandise returns, which are overflowing retail warehouses across the country. And it’s the one that more and more consumers are starting to embrace, Marquette University retail expert Felicia Miller said she’s not sure other stores like it will continue to pop up in the area, but stores are seizing the opportunity, she said. , before the retail landscape changed again. “I’m not sure the pop-ups will continue, but for sure there will be other types of businesses,” Miller said. Meanwhile, the daily discount model seems to be a big hit with a growing number of bargain hunters.

The lure of a bargain sent shoppers to NuNu’s bargains in Greendale on Thursday.

They were taking advantage of a new trend in retail. Some local businesses buy excess inventory from major retailers, such as Target and Walmart, and resell it to consumers at great discounts.

Comaneci Mueller lined up outside NuNu several hours before doors opened on Thursday, the day the last shipment of discounted items arrived.

This store, and others in Racine, Brookfield and other local communities, are part of a new generation of businesses that buy truckloads of excess and overstock from major retailers and resell them at bargain prices. , posting some of their wares on social media.

“We buy backorders, closeouts, excess inventory at Target, Walmart, basically nationwide,” said NuNu store manager Chris Rafalski.

Mueller got a tablet and a microwave, and Maile Ryan found a Ring doorbell, all for $12 apiece.

The store lowers the price of its items each day of the week, possibly as low as $1, until that week’s stock is picked up.

The store closes on Tuesdays and Wednesdays to restock its shelves and bins.

When new pallets of goods hit the sales floor on Thursday, it can create a chaotic scene for shoppers, but that’s part of the business model. It’s a business pattern created by supply chain and shipping issues and a record number of merchandise returns, which are overflowing retail warehouses across the country.

And it’s the one that more and more consumers are starting to adopt,

Marquette University retail expert Felicia Miller said she’s not sure more such stores will continue to pop up in the area, but stores are taking the opportunity, said she said, before the retail landscape changed again.

“I’m not sure the pop-ups will continue, but for sure there will be other types of businesses,” Miller said.

Meanwhile, the daily discount model seems to be a big hit with a growing number of bargain hunters.

“If I can save money in the long run, I’m all for it,” Ryan said.